Risk and Resilience in Fiji, Part 5

Risk and Resilience in Fiji, Part 5

When I chose to live in Fiji for four months, I knew I would most likely enjoy it, but I never expected it to feel like a second home … My experience has taught me things I could have never anticipated, lessons which have contributed to who I am as a student, an international development worker, and above all, as a person.

Read More

Risk and Resilience in Fiji, Part 4

Risk and Resilience in Fiji, Part 4

While working in the informal settlement communities, my coworkers and I often stay to have lunch with the community members. This is considered an important part of forging relationships and gathering information and stories, as conversations flow more freely over platefuls of food when the mood is light. It is also a time when the communities’ minority groups –especially women- feel most secure to bring up some of their most pressing needs and concerns, topics which they may otherwise be too afraid to mention in front of their husbands.  

Read More

Risk and Resilience in Fiji, Part 3

Risk and Resilience in Fiji, Part 3

“We’ve come to Malolo for a field trip as part of our Environmental Impact Assessment class at Fiji National University, so that we may, as my professor claims ‘witness firsthand the issues which arise when developers don’t consult with the local people’, and to try and bring awareness to the EIA process.”

Read More

Risk and Resilience in Fiji, Part 2

Risk and Resilience in Fiji, Part 2

“The unfortunate reality is that climate change does not allocate impacts based on carbon emissions. Rather, the impacts are often the most significant for those communities that are the most vulnerable. So, while Fiji only contributes 0.04% of global average greenhouse gas emissions- the greatest contributors are developed countries- Fijians such as Nihola and her community are paying the price.”

Read More

Risk and Resilience in Fiji, Part 1

Risk and Resilience in Fiji, Part 1

“I grew up believing that the world needed saving, but that world was a caricature: of people in developing countries that are helpless, communities full of poor mothers and starving children eking by in barren landscapes.” Coastal Routes undergraduate affiliate Yanik Rozon offers her inaugural post from her internship in Fiji!

Read More